Back Up Lights

RANK
#1

Overall Rating

based on 85355 reviews

9.0

RANK
#2

Overall Rating

based on 18520 reviews

9.2

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎T15-15E-JM-W2

Item Weight: ‎0.634 ounces

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

RANK
#3

Overall Rating

based on 14442 reviews

9.0

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎IBrightstar-3157-3014/3030-54/3W

Item Weight: ‎0.42 ounces

Product Dimensions: ‎1.82 x 0.88 x 0.67 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Voltage : ‎12 Volts

Wattage: ‎3.8 watts

RANK
#4

Overall Rating

based on 12858 reviews

9.2

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎60001F-B

Item Weight: ‎1 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎6 x 3 x 3 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Voltage : ‎12 Volts

RANK
#5

Overall Rating

based on 7911 reviews

9.0

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎IBrightstar-1157-3014/3030-54/3W

Item Weight: ‎0.42 ounces

Product Dimensions: ‎1.82 x 0.88 x 0.67 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Voltage : ‎12 Volts

Wattage: ‎3.8 watts

RANK
#6

Overall Rating

based on 7410 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎Alla-921-4014-30W-Back-up-Reverse

Item Weight: ‎0.422 ounces

Product Dimensions: ‎1.67 x 0.5 x 0.3 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Voltage : ‎12 Volts

Wattage: ‎6.5 watts

RANK
#7

Overall Rating

based on 5426 reviews

9.0

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎IBrightstar-7443-3014/3030-54/3W

Item Weight: ‎0.42 ounces

Product Dimensions: ‎1.82 x 0.88 x 0.67 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Voltage : ‎12 Volts

Wattage: ‎3.8 watts

RANK
#8

Overall Rating

based on 4827 reviews

9.2

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎JDM ASTAR-921-EX-90W

Item Weight: ‎0.634 ounces

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

RANK
#9

Overall Rating

based on 4271 reviews

9.0

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎IBrightstar-T15-3014 3030-54 3W

Item Weight: ‎0.64 ounces

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Voltage : ‎12 Volts

Wattage: ‎3.5 watts

RANK
#10

Overall Rating

based on 3787 reviews

9.2

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎14023F-B

Item Weight: ‎2.02 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎6.5 x 5 x 3.5 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Voltage : ‎12 Volts

Buyer's Guide: Back Up Lights

What To Know Before Buying Back Up Lights

When you're driving, headlights illuminate the road ahead and provide visibility. But what about when it's dark? Or if you need to back up?

Back-up lights are crucial for cars and trucks to make your vehicle visible and safe to other drivers. But with so many different types of lighting systems out there, how do you know which one is right for you? Whether you're looking for a wired backup light or an LED that plugs into the cigarette lighter, this post will help answer any questions you may have.

What are backup lights?

Most cars and trucks with either the front or rear lamps will have a backup light mounted underneath them. They also come in a few different configurations, depending on the manufacturer. Some automakers use a separate spotlight or integral backup light; others choose to mount the backup light as part of the rear reflector assembly. If your vehicle's brake lights are enabled, these lights also automatically function as backup lights when the brake is released.

There are two main types of backup lights: wired and integrated. Generally speaking, integrated backup lights are on a set of cables that snake across the top of the dashboard. These lights are simple to install.

What are the benefits of having backup lights?

Back-up lights provide additional safety when backing up your car and provide you with an increased sense of security and safety. Although these lights are intended to be used in your cars, other areas of your home can benefit from having backup lights. Fireplaces, washing machines, dryers, and even bicycles are examples of lighted areas that can benefit from having a backup light.

If you have an automatic transmission, most cars don’t have automatic transmission with the option to change into reverse gear. You may need to use your manual transmission shift lever to change it into reverse. Start by lifting the lever until the backlight switch is pushed down. Then put the transmission in the park and make sure the brakes are not engaged.

Things to consider before purchasing back up Lights?

Backup lights are available in many different styles and types. It would help if you tried to get a pair with two backup lights (one on each side of your car). Also, be aware that they don’t always have the features you want. Sometimes the lights only come on when you shift into reverse, and sometimes they don’t come on at all.

Most backup lights come with an instruction manual that gives you step-by-step instructions to use them. The instructions are usually printed on the batteries and plugged in your backup lights to the interior of your car. Many systems come with a switch that switches the lights on and off. This feature is handy in case your batteries die.

Types of Back-Up Lights

When it comes to backup lights, there are two basic types to consider: wired and wireless. There are also others, but these are the most popular. Some vehicles do not include a backup light, and these you will need to source separately.

Wired backup lights

Most people still drive their cars with a corded backup light. The reason? They work great and they don't use any electricity. Most backup lights feature a battery backup and so there is no wiring to deal with.

The positives of a wired backup light include ease of installation and longevity. Plus, the light itself will last for a long time. It doesn't matter if it's dim, bright, or white. In fact, since you're not doing any electrical work, you can always have multiple backup lights.

Wireless backup lights

Back-up lights that operate without wires are the most popular backup lights. These lights work by plugging into the cigarette lighter port of your car or truck. They generally cost $30-$50, but you may also find battery back-up lights for a few dollars more.

Fit

When purchasing a rear backup light, make sure you fit it correctly. An incorrectly fitting backup light may dim or be an oversized portion of your car.

One of the main types of backup lights is flashing. These lights provide an essential function of increasing your visibility and alerting other drivers when backing up. While flashing lights are the best choice for those, who do not want to manually activate the lights, be careful to only turn on the high-intensity ones for the direction of your vehicle's wheels. These types of lights may be placed too close to your wheels and are a distraction for you.

Brightness

Just like your headlights, your backup lights should also be bright enough to be seen at a distance and back up safely in traffic. They should also be easy to switch on and off, and should be intuitive to use. Look for lights that come with a remote switch or buttons on the outside of the car, or at least a knob for setting the intensity.

Flexibility

It should be easily installed, and you shouldn't have to worry about getting the mounting bracket out and put back in again over and over. Most car manufacturers will provide a mount in the trunk, and you should be able to find a universal bolt, lever, or bracket that will accommodate most any light.

Prices

Choosing the right backup light is about more than just price. The kind of backup light you need has a big impact on price. High-end devices can be very expensive, especially when you consider the extra features and software that's typically built in. A lot of these devices even come with external backup batteries. Other models, such as lower-end backup lights, rely on an internal rechargeable battery.

You'll also want to consider the back-up light's overall portability. Some of the best budget backup lights are so bulky that they'll take up a lot of valuable storage space in your glove box.

How to choose the best backup lights for your specific needs

Before you buy your new backup lights, make sure you know what type of installation it will take. And once you know that, you'll be ready to select the most appropriate backup light for your vehicle.

Manual backup lights: Most backup lights can be operated manually via a switch or a crank on the dash or the key fob. Some light-up dome or pedestal bulbs are also available.

Light Up Domes: These types of lights have lights that are permanently attached to a pedestal (or dome) in the dash or trunk, and typically have a crank for making the light go on and off. The bulbs can be one of the color-changing, LED-type bulbs, but some types are non-LED and have low-light bulbs (just like traditional, non-light-up dome lights).

Final thoughts

Before installing a backup light on your car, ensure you have extra lighting and any needed accessory installed. If the car is a hybrid vehicle or electric, you can always switch it off. You can also make it, so the light only comes on when needed. For example, the car is driving slower than 40 miles per hour and is transitioning into reverse. This type of light is also known as a parking marker.

FAQs: Back Up Lights

What are back up lights on a car?

Backup lights are white lights that illuminate when a vehicle moves backwards.

Where is the backup light?

In this manual, the IG1 circuit is used to fuse the reverse light fuse, also known as the "backup light." It can be found beneath the dash fuse box.

What is the purpose of back up light?

A backup light is a lamp that shines behind a vehicle when it is in reverse, particularly when reversing.

How do back up lights work?

This switch is linked to the mechanism of your gear selector. When you shift into reverse, the switch activates your reverse lights. Reverse lights are an important safety device because they alert other drivers and pedestrians that your vehicle is backing up.

Are reverse lights the same as brake lights?

This is due to the fact that the brake and turn signal use the same wires and bulbs on both sides. Because the ground for all rear lights is the same, if one of them fails, the brake light may find ground via the parking light circuit. The reverse light, on the other hand, did not work.

When backing up it is best to what?

Turn your head to see behind you when backing up. You should only use one hand when backing up or operating the vehicle controls. Always keep both hands on the steering wheel at all times.

When backing up where do you look?

Turn around and look over your right shoulder when backing up. Don't rely on reflections. Before getting into a car, a driver must always look behind him or her. From the driver's seat, it is difficult to see small objects, pets, or children.

How does a backup light switch work?

The backup switch refers to the vehicle's backup light switch, which is an electronic switch that activates the vehicle's reverse lighting. These switches turn on the lights by engaging the transmission in reverse.

*Disclaimer: Consumer Automotive Research is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking. (20155)