Tires

RANK
#1

Overall Rating

based on 1633 reviews

9.0

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎24470009

Item Weight: ‎23.7 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎26.3 x 26.3 x 8.5 inches

RANK
#2

Overall Rating

based on 790 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎732674500

Item Weight: ‎20.4 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎24.9 x 24.9 x 8.1 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

RANK
#3

Overall Rating

based on 458 reviews

9.6

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎90000032619

Item Weight: ‎60.7 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎34.13 x 11.5 x 34.13 inches

RANK
#4

Overall Rating

based on 352 reviews

9.6

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎1021507

Item Weight: ‎24.2 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎28.4 x 28.4 x 9.4 inches

RANK
#5

Overall Rating

based on 336 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎741126681

Item Weight: ‎41 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎29 x 9.5 x 29 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

RANK
#6

Overall Rating

based on 302 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎HP1081604

Item Weight: ‎21 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎23 x 23 x 7 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

RANK
#7

Overall Rating

based on 277 reviews

9.6

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎1013373

Item Weight: ‎41 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎33 x 33 x 11 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

RANK
#8

Overall Rating

based on 227 reviews

9.6

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎1021397

Item Weight: ‎27.3 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎28.39 x 28.39 x 9.4 inches

RANK
#9

Overall Rating

based on 222 reviews

9.2

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎90000034447

Item Weight: ‎17.86 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎24.2 x 24.2 x 7.9 inches

RANK
#10

Overall Rating

based on 219 reviews

9.6

Manufacturer: Part Number ‎1016678

Item Weight: ‎39.3 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎31.6 x 31.6 x 10.6 inches

Buyer's Guide: Tires

Buyers Guide: How to Choose the Best Tire for Your Car

Despite advancements in tire technology, a tire's tread life is finite and will vary based on the kind of vehicle, tire type, driving aggressiveness, and even road and weather conditions. Tires must be replaced during the life of a vehicle. As the proverb goes, nothing lasts in this world or the next.

It is possible to increase the life of a tire by driving safely and properly maintaining it. Regular tire inspections will reveal the federally mandated treadwear signs. This will assist you in determining when it is time to change your tires.

Different Types of Tires

It's a good idea to know what sort of tires you already have and what your options are for getting new ones. In most cases, we recommend obtaining replacements that match the speed and size of your previous ones. Utilize the ratings to find vehicles that excel in areas like as handling, noise, braking, and ride comfort. For further information, please see our comprehensive tire ratings.

All-Season Car Tires

All-season tires, which come in a number of sizes, can assist small cars, light-duty trucks, and SUVs. These tires offer all-season traction, long treadwear, and a comfortable ride. All-season tires lack the traction and accuracy of more costly performance tires.

Performance All-Season Car Tires

In all weather situations, this style of tire gives outstanding traction. They are faster and more responsive than all-season tires.

Ultra High Performance Level

All-season and summer ultra-high-performance tires are standard on most high-end sedans and sports vehicles. These all-season UHP tires provide excellent handling and rapid steering in both wet and dry conditions. Treadwear and riding comfort, on the other hand, are often trade-offs. Summer UHP tires are not recommended for use in snowy or icy conditions since they lack grip in cold weather. In the winter, all-season tires may lose traction.

All-Season Truck Tires

All-season truck tires are available that can handle SUV and pickup-sized loads. This pair of tires is equipped to handle any circumstance.

SUVs All-Season Tires

All-season tires are a must-have item for today's SUVs. They are essentially a cross between a truck and a car. These cars' tires have been designed to provide the best performance, comfort, and light-duty lifting capabilities.

All-terrain Truck Tires

All-terrain truck tires are made for heavy-duty applications. They may also be used on unpaved roads. This tread is designed for snowy and unpaved roads and has a more robust structure.

Snow Tires

When it's cold outdoors, snow tires give more traction. They wear out faster than all-season tires because the tread is engineered to grip snow and ice and the rubber is developed for cold temperatures. Even on dry roads, winter/snow tires are more difficult to stop on than other types of tires. Our winter/snow tire testing comprises a wide range of tires for sedans, sports cars, trucks, and SUVs (SUV).

Tires Made for Winter/Snow Use

These high-performance winter/snow tires are compatible with UHP all-season and UHP summer tires. These tires are intended to replace UHP all-season and summer tires, giving improved winter traction.

Truck winter/snow tires

Winter/snow tires for SUVs and pickup trucks were specifically built for this purpose. Truck winter/snow tires, like automotive winter/snow tires, are designed to be used in pairs.

Tire Pressure Monitoring Sensors

Tire pressure monitoring devices have been standard on new autos since 2008. (TPMS). According to government research, the strategy has reduced the number of underinflated tires on the road, which has increased fuel efficiency and safety.

The vehicle must be capable of monitoring the pressure and alerting the driver if it drops below a specified threshold. However, no mention of the technique employed is made. Wheel sensors wirelessly transmit data to your car's instrument panel, allowing you to monitor tire pressure. Batteries in direct TPMS systems may need to be replaced every few years. This may entail the replacement of the whole sensor. While simpler systems just flash a light to alert you to a drop in tire pressure, more complex systems can provide an actual readout of your tires' pressure.

Direct systems rely on the anti-lock braking system to detect and interpret wheel speed and pressure. These devices are unable to display pressure because they lack pressure sensors.

Tire Maintenance

Because of the longer tire life, safety inspections are more important than ever. There are currently tires on the market that can go up to 50,000 miles before degrading. They can, however, fail owing to heat, environmental factors, and underinflation.

How To Keep Your Tire Safe

  • Before driving more than a few kilometers, check the air pressure in the tires once a month. Make that they are inflated to the correct pressure, as indicated on the plaque or inside the glove compartment/fuel-filler door. The maximum tire pressure is specified on the tire's sidewall and should not be exceeded.

  • It is time to replace a tire if the tread or sidewall shows fractures, cuts, or bulges.

  • Examine the treads for uneven wear. This implies an issue with the alignment of the car or worn suspension elements. A skilled professional should check both. Check your vehicle's suspension and alignment before putting new tires.

  • Make sure you stick to the vehicle's weight limit, which is plainly marked on the doorjamb. Tires that are overloaded may overheat, increasing the danger of a blowout.
  • Using a quarter, measure the tread depth. If the top of George Washington can be seen when placed in a tire groove, the tread should be about 4/32 inch deep. This is a fantastic place to start if you're seeking for a decent all-weather grip.

*Disclaimer: Consumer Automotive Research is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking. (21977)